Skip navigation

sous vide yoghurt temperatures

These jars of milk, left to right, were heated to 45, 55, 65, 75 and 85°C respectively, prior to being cultured at 45°C for 8 hours. Then a teaspoon of each placed on an incline plane tilted to about 30° for a few seconds to see how far each would run.

Read More »

red hook blocks

Today we Jeeped our bikes over to Red Hook in Brooklyn, New York to explore a shabby neighborhood showing signs of gentrification — with an intriguing range of sights, restaurants and shops. It was an interesting adventure!

Read More »

Mandela Day Pledge

Thursday 18th July, 2013 is Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela’s 95th birthday. Please rise to the International Mandela Day’s call to action: Pledge to spend at least 67 minutes of your time making the world we live in a better place, one small step at a time. Read More »

Member of The Internet Defense League

Do you? Read More »

KPPC Harry in the staircase of Building #92

What to do on the weekend? When you’ve done everything else it’s time for urban exploring. On Saturday we decided to explore the ruins of the Kings Park Psychiatric Center in Smithtown. You’d think this could be trespassing but signs to keep people out may have been vandalised along with the buildings. We enter where many have gone before …

Read More »

yoghurt 4 with fruitPerfect steaks and juicy ribs are my favourite outcomes dabbling in sous vide. Shrimp, fish, chicken, turkey and eggs are not much improved by my palette when cooked this way. So what to try next? Yoghurt!

I’m lactose intolerant so a well cultured yoghurt will digest most of the lactose and leave me with something I can dollop onto my All Bran Flakes or a fruit salad for breakfast in the morning.

Using the same starter, organic milk, culturing temperature and times yields surprisingly different results, from a pouring yoghurt to a thick cream cheese. Read More »

david and harlie

Caption: Cousins David Aureliano and Harlie Treanor.

Close family friends lost children in last year’s Fourth of July boating tragedy off Long Island’s North shore. Hailey Treanor, her grandma, aunt and cousins — many of whom were on the boat that capsized — are petitioning the Long Island Coast Guard to equip themselves for underwater rescues.

Although the Coast Guard were on the scene within minutes they were unable to dive into the water to rescue David and Harlie trapped in the cabin. They may have survived if the Coast Guard were equipped with scuba gear and trained divers. It’s a worthy cause that might save lives in the future. Please sign Hailey’s petition here.

Update: July 4th, 2013. According to Newsday*, one year after the tragic accident, the Coast Guard’s lack of equipment and training to effect fast underwater rescues is being addressed. Yay!

*May require registration!

Should the biggest banks that nearly destroyed our economy pay less interest on loans from the Federal Government than our students who are the future around whom our recovery will pivot? Elizabeth Warren says “No”, let’s support her …

 

 
Sign the petition here

Perhaps it’s just me, but I just noticed this today …

google pimping out their home page

Does this make good business sense for Google, or does it shatter the illusion — that of the biggest ad revenue generating machine known to man being (previously) naked of any advertising on their home page?  Read More »

lekker and liqour summer shrimp and corn saladWho knew that a Summer Shrimp & Corn Salad, sans any red meat, could impress us “boneheaded meat lovers”?

Well, I should have!

Read More »

candle lighter bottle rocket - parts

A quickie mini-maker project: Launch a bottle rocket from a modified candle lighter … Read More »

ryan ferguson 2What if there is no matching physical evidence, no weapon, no connection, no motive, no DNA and the two original eyewitness testimonies, on which the conviction hinged, were recanted — claiming they were made under police and prosecutorial duress?

Should Ryan Ferguson get a new trial?

Read More »

This started out as a 48 hour experiment but I wasn’t hungry last night, even though this is a pretty small rack of ribs. So I left them in the hot water bath for another 18 hours until lunch today! This speaks to a benefit of sous vide: With most foods, when you’re cooking up near the safety of 60˚C, you have a wide window in which to finish off and serve up a meal — still cooked to perfection.

sous vide 60hr ribs at 60C served

Read More »

Cooking en sous vide requires a hot water bath with precisely controlled temperatures and a method of vacuum sealing food in bags. Accurate timing isn’t required but a digital thermometer is a good idea to ensure food safety and doneness.

My own bath is a piece of old lab equipment which I refurbished using an STC-1000 temperature controller. It’s not typically where you would start out experimenting but the volume of water it holds and the circulating pump is ideal for cooking larger family meals.

souse vide stc-1000 and haake parts

The key piece of hardware I used is an STC-1000 temperature controller which is typically used in tropical aquariums, beer brewing and now also sous vide.

Read More »

20130221-195001.jpgAssembled and under test: What lay flat and precariously wired up on my workbench has been neatly bundled up. A piece of lab equipment brought back to life, it’s original temperature controller replaced with an inexpensive STC-1000 controller typically used as a thermostat in tropical aquariums, beer brewing — and, most recently, in sous vide.

Read More »